Meguro Parasitological Museum, Tokyo

What’s the first thing you do in order to combat the dreaded jet lag having being awake approximately 20 hours on your journey over to Tokyo . . . well personally I’d recommend a trip to the local parasite museum. Sadly this recommendation would only work in Tokyo, since Meguro Parasitological Museum claims to be the only establishment in the world entirely devoted to these clingy critters.

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Sedlec Ossuary, Kutna Hora

It may be macabre, but Sedlec Ossuary was at the top of my list for things to visit in and around Prague. My Masters dissertation was on repositories that care for human remains and the guidance that is followed in relation to these remains. This has fuelled an interest in the display of human remains and how they are perceived by the general public. There are an abundance of ossuaries in Europe, in comparison to the two in the UK. This memento mori in Sedlec is particularly spectacular due to the decorative arrangement of the remains. Continue reading “Sedlec Ossuary, Kutna Hora”

Old Mother Shipton’s Cave, Knaresborough

Want a one off, weird outing? Old Mother Shipton’s Cave will be right up your street. The oldest tourist attraction in England, having been open since 1630, is home to a petrifying well and is said to have been the home of Old Mother Shipton, a famous prophetess from the Tudor period. It’s expensive, but for a one off, it was probably worth it. Continue reading “Old Mother Shipton’s Cave, Knaresborough”

Icelandic Phallological Museum

If you ask google what a museum is it describes it as building that stores and displays objects of historical, scientific, artistic or cultural interest. In 1998 the Museums Association agreed to define museums as places that ‘enable people to explore collections for inspiration, learning and enjoyment. They are institutions that collect, safeguard and make accessible artefacts and specimens, which they hold in trust for society’.

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